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MH370: Chinese patrol ship detects pulse signal

MH370: Chinese patrol ship detects pulse signal

A pinger locator on an Australian ship during the search for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370

Haixun 01 records signal with same frequency as that emitted by black boxes, reports say

"Chinese patrol ship Haixun 01 searching for flight MH370 discovered a pulse signal with a frequency of 37.5kHz per second in south Indian Ocean waters Saturday," the official news agency, Xinhua, said. It also reported that a Chinese air force plane spotted a number of white floating objects in the search area.

 
Darrell Issa wants Elijah Cummings to disclose talks with Lois Lerner's attorney

Darrell Issa wants Elijah Cummings to disclose talks with Lois Lerner's attorney

By SEAN LENGELL

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., asked the panel's top Democrat to disclose communications between his office and the lawyer for former IRS official Lois Lerner, who faces contempt charges before the committee.

The panel is investigating Lerner — who headed the Exempt Organizations division of the agency when it controversially targeted conservative groups — and will vote on contempt charges on the grounds that she has refused to cooperate with the probe.

"As you know, Mr. Taylor's position with regard to Ms. Lerner's willingness to cooperate with the committee has changed several times," Issa wrote. "So that all members of the committee can have a better understanding of Mr. Taylor's current position, please disclose any communications that you or your staff have had with Mr. Taylor."

 
What Bobby Jones Might Say About the Masters

What Bobby Jones Might Say About the Masters

By John Paul Newport

Jones wanted "excruciating torture" on the back nine on Sunday

Short of the Super Bowl, the Masters is America's most extravagantly successful sporting event. The tournament has become so rich over the years, from television, ticket and merchandise sales, that Augusta National, the host club, last year opened a spectacular, 90,000-square-foot VIP hospitality facility at the west end of the course. The club helps fund major amateur competitions in Asia and South America and makes big-dollar contributions to the First Tee program and other good-for-golf initiatives.

As the golf world gathers there this coming week, Augusta National's founder, Bobby Jones, might have been stunned at what his beloved Masters has become. He attended his last tournament in 1971, eight months before his death. That year Charles Coody, a drab but personable Texan, beat out Jack Nicklaus and Johnny Miller by two strokes. His winner's check of $25,000, adjusted for inflation, equates to $145,000 today, or one-tenth of this year's $1.4 million for the winner.

For Jones, a patrician lifelong amateur, the Masters never was about the purse. Money talk in general was beneath his dignity. What Jones might have thought about women and African-American members at his club today is unknowable, but they weren't admitted under his watch. He would likely have been dismayed by players using modern equipment to effortlessly carry their tee shots 320 yards or more.

All in all, however, if Jones is rolling in his grave, most likely it's to get a better view of the spectacle he wrought. "I think he would be very proud of what they have done at Augusta," Arnold Palmer said when I asked him about it on a media conference call this week. "Most of the things that have happened at Augusta and at the Masters are things that Jones had in mind in his life."

 
Meet the Company That Built ‘Cuban Twitter'

Meet the Company That Built ‘Cuban Twitter'

 By Robinson Meyer

How the U.S. government tried to undermine the country's regime using the Internet

The United States discreetly supported the creation of a website and SMS service that was, basically, a Cuban version of Twitter, the Associated Press reported Thursday. ZunZuneo, as it was called, permitted Cubans to broadcast short text messages to each other. At its peak, ZunZuneo had 40,000 users.

And what government agency made ZunZuneo? It wasn’t the CIA. No, it was the U.S. Agency for International Development, USAID, working with various private companies, including the D.C. for-profit contractor Creative Associates and a small, Denver-based startup, Mobile Accord.

 
The Obama Administration's 2 Million Deportations, Explained

DHS

Hardliners say Obama is soft on immigration, but advocates call him the "deporter in chief." Which is it?

 What exactly do we mean when we say "deportations"? The government measures deportations in two broad categories: removals and returns. Generally, removals are more serious and carry deeper legal ramifications than returns. Removals are orders issued by a judge, while returns, though also serious, are less strict and allow a person to apply to legally return much faster. (Many people caught at the border used to end up as returns, but that has changed in recent years.) So, although it can be confusing, when people talk about Obama's record-breaking 2 million deportations, they're really talking about removals. According to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) data, there was an average of about 40,000 removals each fiscal year from 1892 to 2008. Fiscal years 2009-12 saw an average of about 396,000. The surge in deportations came in the mid-1990s during the Clinton administration, and has been on a steady rise ever since.

 
The Flip Side of Success…

The Flip Side of Success…

By Judith E. Glaser

Leaders tend to be great talkers because they continually pitch their visions, strategies, products and services. Unfortunately, many leaders discover too late they are failing to connect with and influence others.

 
John Calipari, Chris Webber, and the Myths of Amateurism
  • RTR3J8ND-580.jpg

John Calipari, Chris Webber, and the Myths of Amateurism

  • By Ian Crouch

The men may not be sentimental favorites, but they play clarifying roles in the ongoing drama of N.C.A.A. amateurism.

The Kentucky Wildcats and their coach, John Calipari, are back in the Final Four. And, to the chagrin of some college-basketball watchers, this year’s squad is more Calipari-like than ever, featuring five freshmen in its starting rotation. That hasn’t happened since the Michigan Wolverines, propelled by their young and captivating “Fab Five,” made it all the way to the championship game, in 1992—only to have that record vacated in a scandal involving Chris Webber, the team’s forward, and a booster with a lot of money. As it happens, both Webber and Calipari are part of the story of this year’s tournament. Each man, in his own way, has scrambled the myths that the N.C.A.A. tells us about amateurism in America.

Calipari’s system goes more or less like this: building on your past success, recruit the best young talent in the country; make the new players meet only the most basic academic standards; give them plenty of chances to show off their skills in front of television audiences and pro scouts; and swiftly guide them, likely after just one season in college, to a job in the N.B.A. Rinse and repeat, year after year. (Whether this is much different from other major programs is a matter of debate.) Kentucky won the national championship in 2012 using this model, but the following year’s team, with an entirely different starting lineup, didn’t even make the tournament. Kentucky began this season with another highly touted squad, but, by early March, it looked listless. The team entered the tournament to little fanfare, as a meagre No. 8 seed. Had Calipari’s 2012 title been a fluke? Analysts pointed to a team like Florida, the No. 1 seed, with four senior starters and two wins over Kentucky this season, as evidence that experience and team chemistry might still trump raw talent.

Florida is in the Final Four, too. If it beats Connecticut (which was barred from the tournament last year after the team failed to meet N.C.A.A. academic standards), and were Kentucky to get past Wisconsin, the championship game could feature one of those cherished “big idea” matchups: Florida’s seasoned team versus Kentucky’s loose affiliation of semi-pro mercenaries. Never mind that both sides are still basically kids (and unpaid ones, at that), or that Florida’s older players most likely would have left college early for the N.B.A. if it had been a viable option. The particulars would be overlooked in favor of The Narrative: young versus slightly older, which, in this case, is shorthand for evil versus good.

 
Putin’s Patriotism is Phony, His Desperation is Real

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Putin’s Patriotism is Phony, His Desperation is Real

Russia’s president is gambling the future of his country to consolidate his grip on power. But his economy is in peril and the people who support him today may well revile him tomorrow.

 Whether in the case of his forcible annexation of Crimea, his continued threats against Ukraine or his systematic destruction inside Russia of any vestiges of democracy and free speech from the 1990s, Putin is cloaking himself in a phony patriotism to hide his real motives. He is, in every sense of the term, the anti-patriot, committed to a course that can only steadily weaken his country, hurt its citizens’ prospects for a decent life, and diminish Russia’s influence in the world.

In the long term, the greatest threat to the Russian economy is that its neighbors will find new energy sources elsewhere. By dramatically reviving fears of the Russian bear across Europe, Putin has triggered their first serious efforts to devise strategies to wean themselves off Russian natural gas and oil. He can wield energy as a weapon now, but it is already proving a double-edged sword.

Putin may not care because he sees himself as fighting a more immediate battle for political survival. Whatever his approval ratings, the Russian leader knows how ephemeral they can be. He only has to remind himself of the huge anti-government demonstrations triggered by his return to the presidency in 2012. Putin’s real motive for his behavior since the downfall of Ukraine’s President Viktor Yanukovych is his recognition of the example this could set for his own people.

 
California Democrats Await Fallout After 3 Are Caught Up in Scandals

California Democrats Await Fallout After 3 Are Caught Up in Scandals

  One state senator was charged with conspiring to traffic in arms from the Philippines, and taking bribes from undercover F.B.I. agents including one who posed as a marijuana dealer. Another was accused of taking bribes from federal agents impersonating Hollywood film executives. And a third was convicted of perjury and voter fraud after lying about where he lived when he ran for office.

All three are Democratic state senators from California, and their recent legal problems have brought rare bad news to a party that has come to thoroughly dominate politics in this state but now looks besieged by high-profile corruption cases.

The State Senate voted last Friday to suspend all three men, after the arms trafficking and bribery charges against Senator Leland Yee of San Francisco were made public. Party leaders, however, citing due process, have refused to cast them out, even as Gov. Jerry Brown, also a Democrat, called on the men to resign.

Though there is little chance that Democrats will lose control of the Legislature in November, the suspensions provide ammunition to beleaguered Republicans eyeing close elections in swing districts. The recent string of corruption cases has led Democrats to struggle with how best to discipline the men and keep Republicans from using the scandals to gain political traction.

“One is an anomaly, two is a coincidence, but three?”
 
14 women have tried Marines’ Infantry Officer Course. All of them have failed.

14 women have tried Marines’ Infantry Officer Course. All of them have failed.

Sage Santangelo

A female Marine says women aren’t as prepared as men because they are encouraged to train at lesser standards.

 ’m typical of a Marine in that I’ve always sought out challenges. I flew my first solo flight when I was 15 and got my private pilot’s license three years ago at 21. I’ve climbed 10 of the 14,000-foot peaks in my home state of Colorado. As an ice hockey goalie for more than a decade, I put myself in the path of pucks flying at 80 mph.

I expected that this, though, would be the toughest experience I’d ever had.

There’s a lot of mystery surrounding the arduous 13-week course used to screen and train potential infantry officers. Past participants are asked not to talk about it, in order to preserve the uncertainty for future classes. So we lieutenants had little idea of what we were getting into. But we knew that the first day is always the Combat Endurance Test, and that it pushes people to the limits of their physical and mental capabilities.

Several hours into the test, I jogged past a lieutenant who was overcome with cramps and vomiting on the side of the road. The temperature hovered just above freezing. A blister bled on my foot and sweat poured down my face, yet I felt relatively good. I had completed all the tasks so far within the time allotted, and I was determined to make it to the end without showing any weakness. A packet of MRE cheese spread gave me new life. I shook frost from my uniform, threw my pack on my back, slung my rifle and jogged on through the woods.

But there came a point when I could not persuade my body to perform. It wasn’t a matter of will but of pure physical strength. My mind wanted more, but my muscles quivered in failure after multiple attempts. I began to shiver as I got cold. I was told I could not continue.

 
Democrats squawk as cracks form in immigration coalition

Democrats squawk as cracks form in immigration coalition

By Byron York

Immigration reform advocates are fond of citing broad support for their cause. But the coalition behind the Senate Gang of Eight comprehensive reform bill is fragile and loosely cobbled together. How could Big Labor, the Chamber of Commerce, the tech world and Big Agriculture all unite.

For a long time, opponents of comprehensive immigration reform have thought: Why shouldn't the Republican-controlled House pass an H-1B expansion as a stand-alone bill? If the tech people got what they wanted, would they — and their millions of dollars — really stick around to fight hard for the rest of comprehensive reform? Passing an H-1B bill would be an excellent way to split the fragile pro-reform coalition.

 
Have You Accidentally Sabotaged Your Motivation to Work?

Have You Accidentally Sabotaged Your Motivation to Work?

By Jim Stone, Ph.D.

Junk food can spoil our appetites for more wholesome foods. Can psychological junk food spoil our appetites for work?

 
Gaming-Millionaire Blues
  • PHOTOGRAPH: JIM WILSON/THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX

Gaming-Millionaire Blues

  • by Simon Parkin

For many young game-maker millionaires, the sudden wealth and attention can be jarring.

One night in March, 2013, Rami Ismail and his business partner Jan Willem released a game for mobile phones called Ridiculous Fishing. Ismail, who was twenty-four at the time and who lives in the Netherlands, woke the following morning to find that the game had made him tens of thousands of dollars overnight. His first reaction was not elation but guilt. His mother, who has a job in local government, had already left for work. “Ever since I was a kid I’ve watched my mom wake up at six in the morning, work all day, come home, make my brother and me dinner—maybe shout at me for too much ‘computering,’ ” he said. “My first thought that day was that while I was asleep I’d made more money than she had all year. And I’d done it with a mobile-phone game about shooting fish with a machine gun.”

Ridiculous Fishing made a hundred thousand dollars in its first month on Apple’s App Store. It won the Design Award at the 2013 Apple Worldwide Developers Conference and continued to sell well, passing a million dollars in sales within six months of its release. Ismail and Willem had begun making games together while in college, and to create Ridiculous Fishing they had worked in borrowed office space and subsisted on a diet of instant ramen. “Somewhere in the back of your head you know that you worked hard, that you sacrificed your stability and you took on the risk of financial ruin for a long while,” Ismail told me. “You did things that other people were not willing or capable of. And that paid off. But, even so, it feels awful. I couldn’t get rid of the image of my mother in her car, driving to work.”

 
Supreme Court’s War on Democracy

Supreme Court’s War on Democracy

  • By Dean Obeidallah

  • The conservative-controlled court is taking out one campaign finance law after another. Will Americans keep going to polls if they know it doesn’t matter?

Campaign finance laws, often enacted in a bipartisan manner, were designed to counter corruption and give people confidence in the integrity of our elections. But now they are falling like dominoes—and that’s truly a threat to our democracy.

 
Is China the Next Lehman Brothers?
  • PHOTOGRAPH: JOHN W. BANAGAN/GETTY

Is China the Next Lehman Brothers?

  • by John Cassidy

Even if China can avoid the immediate danger of a real-estate crash, the move to a more durable growth model represents a tremendous challenge.

In the past few years, however, China’s growth rate has slowed down a bit, and the country has racked up large debts. How large? Wolf provides a disturbing chart, based on figures from the International Monetary Fund, that shows overall debts rising from about a hundred and twenty-five per cent of G.D.P. in 2008 to two hundred per cent in 2013. That’s quite a leap. As anybody who has visited China recently can confirm, it has coincided with an enormous building boom, which has left many cities festooned with empty apartment buildings and shopping malls.

The worry is that large parts of China now resemble Arizona, Florida, and Nevada circa 2007, when the great Greenspan-Bernanke real-estate bubble was going “pop.” “Signs are mounting that the housing market in a number of cities is not just cooling but actually cracking,” Wei Jao, an economist at Société Générale, wrote recently. According to a lengthy report from China in Thursday’s F.T., which quoted Jao, developers are already slashing prices by up to forty per cent in selected areas. But that hasn’t been sufficient to prevent some of them from having trouble keeping up interest payments on the loans they took out to finance construction. And that, in turn, is raising concerns about the Chinese financial institutions that did much of the lending, such as banks, “shadow banks,” and trust companies.

 
What Is Healthy Distraction?

What Is Healthy Distraction?

By David Sack, M.D.

running may be a healthy distraction

Mental distraction is a technique that has been used effectively for a number of physical and mental health issues. Though seemingly simple, choosing to distract yourself from a craving or painful emotion is actually far more complex than the automatic response of drug use.

 
A World Where Flights Aren't Canceled

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A World Where Flights Aren't Canceled

Last year, Delta Air Lines canceled just 0.3% of its flights—twice as good as the next-best airlines. Scott McCartney goes inside the carrier's new strategies to avoid stranding fliers.

Typically the airline has about 20 spare airplanes of different sizes each day. About half are stationed in Atlanta and the rest spread around other domestic hubs and two in Tokyo. Delta may start the day with 10 airplanes out of service. It used to have nearly double that, but has improved its maintenance work. That means that if a remaining spare or two are pressed into service in Minneapolis and some planes with a few minor health concerns are scheduled for evening trips out of Minneapolis, a spare from Atlanta may be shifted north, an expense few airlines would take before there was an actual breakdown.

 
If Ivy League men feel entitled to sex, why is Harvard stuck on 'no means no'?

Harvard UK US universities

If Ivy League men feel entitled to sex, why is Harvard stuck on 'no means no'?

jill filipovic updated

Jill Filipovic

An anonymous Harvard sexual assault victim exposes a culture that may lead to violence – but little change

Why aren't schools like Harvard, with their vast financial and intellectual resources, with their leadership position at the very top of higher education, doing a better job? Why have the best universities in America turned from in loco parentis to incommunicado?

The usual sad suspects are all out again: Ivy League entitlement, institutional self-protection, impulsive identification with the accused rather than the accuser.

Jaclyn Friedman, a sexual assault educator from Boston who has worked with Harvard students, told me that they say young women are bussed in from Boston University and Wellesley to attend parties and social events at Final Clubs – the Harvard equivalent of fraternities.

"The attitude is, 'these girls are lucky to be at this party,'" Friedman says. "That inherent power dynamic feeds right into rape culture."

 
The 'Most Powerful Man in China' Is About to Be Purged

The 'Most Powerful Man in China' Is About to Be Purged

 Matt Schiavenza

And it's about politics, not corruption.

Who is Zhou Yongkang, and why is he in trouble? The official reason is corruption. Raised in a village near Wuxi, in Jiangsu province, the 71-year-old Zhou rose through the ranks of China’s oil industry, becoming chairman of China’s National Petroleum Corporation in 1996. Successively important government posts followed, and by 2007 Zhou had earned one of the nine seats on the Politburo Standing Committee, China’s highest governing body. If ever a man seemed untouchable, it was Zhou. Running domestic security in a country obsessed with internal threats, he managed to obtain vast power. Zhou, more than anyone else in China, knows where the bodies are buried.

Yet even as Zhou amassed power, the political winds in China began to shift. In 2013, Xi Jinping became president and pledged to make anti-corruption the centerpiece of his agenda, responding (in no small part) to widespread public disgust at official wealth. Almost immediately, Xi forbade the visible signs of privilege—things like lavish banquets, Gucci handbags, and fancy cars—that once characterized China’s ruling class. As a result of his decree, high-end liquor sales are way down in China, and, naturally, public interest in government service has plummeted.

 
Four Reasons Not to Settle in Relationships

Four Reasons Not to Settle in Relationships

By Juliana Breines, Ph.D.

Fear of loneliness, the stigma associated with being single, and certain cognitive biases can make settling seem like an appealing option. But research suggests that we are better off holding out.

3. The possibility of finding true love may be worth the risk of not finding it. Settling is the safe bet, whereas holding out is a gamble. There is a reasonable chance that you won’t find true love. But the payoff is so much bigger. For every story you hear about someone who was too picky and ended up alone and miserable, there is another story about someone who stuck to their guns (despite harassment from friends and family) and ultimately found someone amazing who made the wait more than worth it.

 
Nigella Lawson stopped from boarding flight to US after cocaine confession

Nigella Lawson

Nigella Lawson stopped from boarding flight to US after cocaine confession

TV cook was barred from boarding a flight from Heathrow to Los Angeles at the weekend

"She didn't seem to say much but she did not look happy," the onlooker said. "She could not get on the flight so she had to turn around and leave."

While Lawson has not been convicted for any drug offence, it appears that US officials have still decided to deny her entrance to the country. The US department of homeland security told the Mail that foreigners who had admitted drug taking were deemed "inadmissible".

 
‘Nobody deserves to be raped’ campaign responds to shocking Brazilian survey

Women who belong to the Bastardxs Movement hold protest signs on Ipanema beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014. Protesters said they were demonstrating against physical and psychological violence against women by wearing a range of clothing, from fully covered to almost nothing, to make the point they have the right to wear whatever they want. Their signs, from left to right, some in Portuguese, read: "Dressed or naked, I want to be respected," "PSIU is not my name," referring to a slang term used in cat calls by men; "Don't tell me what to wear, tell men not to rape," and "This is not an invitation." The Bastardxs Movement is a Brazilian based women's rights group.  (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

‘Nobody deserves to be raped’ campaign responds to shocking Brazilian survey

 There are few statistics more jarring than this one: According to a survey released late last week, 65.1 percent of Brazilians think that if a woman is “dressed provocatively,” she deserves to be “attacked and raped.” Here’s another one: 59 percent of the 3,810 respondents across 212 cities said that if a Brazilian woman “knew how to behave,” there would be fewer rapes.

And then there’s this: More than two-thirds of the respondents were women.

 
Bill Clinton talks aliens with Jimmy Kimmel. And what else?

Bill Clinton talks aliens with Jimmy Kimmel. And what else?

 By Peter Grier

In a surprise move, the 42nd president of the United States took to discussing aliens with Jimmy Kimmel. As president, Bill Clinton ordered aides to investigate the rumors. But did he stop there?

 
Reconsidering the Coach Archetype

Reconsidering the Coach Archetype

By Adam Naylor, EdD, CC-AASP

This seasoned and successful coach seems to understand that fussing and cussing is not much of a way to build a championship team. There is evidence that less dramatic leaders create better functioning teams… exactly what sport is all about.

Gregg Popovich, four-time NBA champion coach of the San Antonio Spurs, challenges what many consider sport “coaching.” In a recent interview with ESPN he seems to suggest that big-time sport coaching has become little more than a dramatic performance—not leading or teaching. He scoffs at the cinema ready leadership approach that is often taken during time outs in basketball games, choosing not to “give [players] some bulls#%@ and act like I’m a coach.”  This seasoned and successful coach seems to understand that fussing and cussing is not much of a way to build a championship team.

 
The NFL never ends at BigTimeFootball.com

The NFL never ends at.....

BigTimeFootball.com

 
One-Minute Wine: Californian Chardonnay

One-Minute Wine: Californian Chardonnay

Jim Clendenen, winemaker at Au Bon Climat, is a paradox. He makes Chardonnay that tastes like it was grown from one of France's classic vineyards—however, he's in California.

 
How Exercise Can Help You Live Longer

How Exercise Can Help You Live Longer

An encouraging new study finds that exercise may slash your risk of heart disease, regardless of your cholesterol numbers or waist size.

If you aren’t active, he said, talk with your doctor about whether you are healthy enough to begin an exercise program. Then, with clearance, go for a walk. In his study, people who walked often and briskly were far more likely to be alive 15 years later than those who rarely got up and moved.

 
Bob Costas CHALLENGES gun-rights supporters: 'Let's make a bet'

“Here’s what I would say to anybody who any time they hear the word guns automatically goes off, like, ‘Oh, they’re going to repeal the Second Amendment,’” he said. “Let’s make a bet, you and me. Let’s say over the next five years — we’ll do a Google search, we’ll have an independent party monitor it — you keep track of how many good and constructive things are associated with athletes having a gun, and I’ll keep track of all the tragedies and criminality and folly. And let’s see who comes out ahead or behind as the case may be. These things are directly connected.”

 
How To Be The Parent Your Child Always Wanted

How To Be The Parent Your Child Always Wanted

By Laura Markham, Ph.D.

What one thing could you do today to support yourself to be the parent you want to be?

Kids like to get their way. But there's something every child wants even more: Someone who loves you, no matter what. Someone who doesn't yell when you make mistakes. Who loves you even when you're mad or whining, who listens and empathizes ...even when you're wrong, even when you were so upset you were rude, even when you hit your sister. Someone who loves you enough to overcome their own upsets to help you through yours. Someone who holds a vision of you as your best self, even when you can't find that self.

 
Germs Rule the World

Germs Rule the World

 Thomas Goetz

Infections play a role many, many diseases—in ways scientists are just beginning to understand.

In the last decade, several diseases understood as strictly noninfectious have, in fact, been found to have significant infectious components. Several forms of cancer, gastrointenstinal diseases, autoimmune illnesses including diabetes, and even some categories of heart disease are all being reconsidered in light of new research. Together, this research amounts to nothing less than a new germ theory, one that could once again alter contemporary definitions of medicine.
 
How McCutcheon Could Come Back to Haunt the Republican Party

How McCutcheon Could Come Back to Haunt the Republican Party

Peter Beinart 

Just as liberal judges trapped 1970s Democrats in a "soft on crime" paradigm, conservatives on the Court will make it harder for the GOP to shake a reputation as the party of plutocrats.

When my kids were younger, I loved to roughhouse with them. For a while, we’d all have fun. But then I’d get tired and want to stop, only to realize, to my dismay, that they were just getting started. I’d created something I could no longer control.

Something similar sometimes happens with political parties and the Supreme Court. In the early decades of the 20th century, conservative Republican presidents appointed conservative Supreme Court justices who went on to strike down chunks of the New Deal. For Republicans, this turned out to be a problem. To adapt to a political environment transformed by the Great Depression, the GOP needed to stop rigidly opposing federal intervention in the economy. But the Supreme Court wouldn’t stop, and Franklin Roosevelt shrewdly used the justices as his political foil. Republicans had created something they could no longer control.

 
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